T-MEK

by Sega

T-MEK ScreenshotT-MEK Screenshots

T-MEKT-MEK DownloadT-MEK Game

MEK is an arcade game in which you can choose between six different vehicles, each with its own unique attributes and enter into a tournament to the death against either computer pilots or a human enemy. Each craft is equipped with radar, which will keep track of where your opponents are hiding throughout the level. It won't take you very long to figure out that with only three buttons--one being a speed booster and the other two for your weapons--the only way you will be able to outsmart and destroy the other players is by sheer strategy. Each level you progress through has different areas or battlegrounds. To plan a strategic attack, use each level to your advantage by hiding behind certain objects such as pillars or luring your opponent out into the open for a clean kill. If you're the kind of player who would rather just go on a suicide mission and head right out into the open unleashing all your weapons at once in a blind fury (like me), then keep an eye out for the vehicles that are hovering above the battleground. If you fly underneath them, you will be able to reload your special weapons. One other notable advantage: After destroying one of the other crafts, you will be able to pick up a defensive power-up right by the wreckage of the craft. This will replenish some of your shields and keep you in the fight for a little while longer. The game features both a One-player and a Two-player Mode. In the One-player Mode, your job is to keep progressing through the levels, but you must also stay in first place in the point standings. Good luck; it gets very difficult at the end. The Two-player Mode seems to be the most fun due to the fact that you can battle against a friend. The only problem is the Split-screen Mode, where a good portion of the screen is taken up by the radar and other gauges, leaving both players very little room to view the battle. Are you tough enough to join the battle? If so, strap on your helmet and get ready for the T-MEK tournament.

Continue: Tempo (arcade/action)

People say:

7.0

I enjoyed the arcade game a lot. It was a fun brainless battler. For some reason it didn't translate well to the home. Sure, the graphics are good, and all the game elements are here, but it doesn't have any substance. Something should have been added. As it is, the sound is pretty good, and the grainy look of the game is minimal. T-MEK slows down quite often, which hurts its score. T-MEK is fun for a few hours, but you'll end up bored after playing it for awhile.

5.0

T-MEK is an arcade translation that falls short of bringing the "real" experience to a home system. The graphics were not the best to begin with in the arcade and have deteriorated further on the home version. I wasn't impressed by the sound either. There was a special feeling in the arcade, but its intensity has been lost. The only positive was the ability to fight another player in an exciting battle to the death. When translated, the element of excitement seems to have been left out.

6.0

In T-MEK, the only goal is to destroy as many enemies as possible within the given time limit. You have a choice of six mechs, which vary in speed, shield and weapons, and six playing fields. The actual game controls fairly well, but it was really stripped down in the conversion from arcade to home system use. I would have enjoyed the game much more if they would have added a few more options in the transition from arcade to home to increase the playability.

6.5

Mech battling in an arena filled with special weapons and obstacles is long overdue forborne systems. However, I feel that T-MEK isn't the title that does the job. T-Mek has a good concept and a challenging game, but its conversion appears to have wasted the increased processing muscle of the 32X. I have no doubt that the same title could have been done the same (if not better) on the Genesis. I really couldn't get into this game at all.

Saddle Your T-Mek And Ride

Every now and again you get the need for pure, unadulterated combat—the desire to trash someone's heavy-duty armored assault vehicle and ride away with a ton of points. T-Mek for the Genesis 32X from Interplay scratches that itch with the barrel of a proton laser attached to the chassis of a high-powered combat hover-tank. Based on a side-by-side coin op, T-Mek is professional, competitive armored combat at its best. You (or you and a second player in a two-player game) enter a series of battle arenas to determine who is the best at hover-tank blasting.

Hover-tank combat is fast and fun. You have a radar that shows color-coded blips of your combatants and of the resupply ships that hover in the battle arena. Your fellow fighters have imaginative names such as Dweezil and Zooot. They do their best to blast down your shields and deliver the telling blow before the timed round ends.

In addition to shield recharges, you can get weapon power-ups that increase the strength of your proton and laser blasters, giving you the blast force to gut an opponent with only a few charges up the engine intake. If you're a deep-thoughts kind of player, T-Mek may be too rich for your blood. But if you like every iota of action that the superpowered 32X can hammer your way, T-Mek may be just the thing to make your blood boil a little faster.

T-MEK rating

T-MEK system requirements:SystemP-200.

Systems: Win9x Windows 9x, Windows 2000 WinXPWindows XP, Vista, Win 7, Win 8, Win 10.

Game modes: T-MEK supports single modeSingle game mode

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