Delta Force: Land Warrior

  • Developer: NovaLogic, Inc.
  • Genre: Arcade/Action
  • Originally on: Windows (2000)
  • Works on: PC, Windows
  • Editor Rating:
    Delta Force: Land Warrior Rating
  • User Rating: 9.0/10 - 4 votes
  • Rate this game:
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Delta Force: Land Warrior 4

Game Overview

Bow your head for one short minute, as we pay tribute to what was once considered a ground-breaking movement in the world of 3D graphics. Today we see the passing away of the Voxel. Over the years it stood firm against the 3D accelerated revolution that swept the gaming world, causing everything other than the most powerful computers to chug away pathetically, as they tried to render its pointy and pixelated visuals. It leaves behind a legacy of no classic games, and subsequently will be missed by no one.

What Goes Around.

So they've finally gone and done it, a Delta Force game in full 3D. Viva La Revolution. Or perhaps I should say Viva La Mutterings Of Mild Political Discontent, because unfortunately, it seems to have arrived with more of a whimper than a war cry. This third instalment apparently utilises the same engine used by the US military to train its elite forces, and quite frankly if this is the case, then the American public should be genuinely worried. The landscapes aren't all that bad, in fact it's pretty rare that you get a game with 3D wide open areas in which you can freely roam around. Project IGI is the only other one that springs to mind.

DFLWs first major problem lies with its indoor locations, in which the frame rate feels totally wrong, even on the most powerful of machines. The animation has less fluidity than a cup of mucus, flickering to near epileptic-fit-inducing proportions in confined corridors. Then there's the clipping. What the hell is going on with that? Kill an enemy and half his body disappears into the floor, even if it's made of stone, and sometimes, if you shoot someone on a slope, they'll hover in mid air as though they've fallen on level ground. It took me two minutes to notice these faults. How a group of play testers and the developers failed to spot them, after spending several intimate months with the game, I'll never Know. And if this really is the engine that the world's most powerful nation uses to train its soldiers, then quite frankly, God help America.

Put Those Guns Away...

It's not all bad, of course, far from it. As a stealth/shooter, it manages to do the job admirably. There's huge scope for tactical variety, which of course allows you to play each mission in a way that suits your playing style (you can even play from a third-person viewpoint, but it's not much cop). You're given a choice between five special-forces soldiers, each with their own specialist skill, stupid student-like nickname (Gas Can, Longbow etc) and detailed description about their character and background. However, once you cut away the sob stories about their messed up childhoods and soul destroying previous professions, you find that what you've actually got is a choice between a demolitions expert, heavy gunner, martial artist, underwater demolitions expert, and a sniper. Unlike TFC, they can all carry any weaponry you care to equip them with, but obviously they'll be at their best when using their favoured weapon.

...See How Positive I'm Being?

DRfVhas one of the finest arrays of military equipment we've ever seen, and in terms of variety, betters even Counter-Strikers selection. Once again, your choice of hardware can be configured to cater for both your character's specialist skill, and your own playing style. If you're the kind of person who likes ripping off your shirt, dabbing on the war paint and screaming, "I am a machine'' while running around your room with a plastic gun, then one of the several rapid fire heavy machine guns should satisfy your would-be-Rambo pretensions.

However, if you've always fancied yourself as a bit of a Lewis Collins-alike, then you can stealthily creep round every level, taking your enemies down with a combination of silenced handguns and stealthy throat slitting knife action. For everyone else, there's a massive collection of assault rifles, with various add ons, such as grenade launchers and shotguns. There are even three different types of sniper rifle, perfect for all you one shot wonders, and the physics are spot on as well. Try running while firing and you'll spray bullets everywhere other than where you're aiming. Ifs a shame then that the same can't be said for your character, whose every jump resembles a graceful ballerina-like prance performed under low gravity conditions.

Each weapon varies in terms of penetration, with several powerful enough to fire through walls, as well as through some enemies with just a single bullet. We'd never even heard of half of this stuff, like the Heckler & Koch P11 Underwater Pistol, which uses an electric charge to fire bullets. Best of all though, there's a bazooka, and you can't say fairer than that.

Levelling With You

In terms of levels, I have to say that they're hardly the most inspiring selection I've ever come across ranging from the Egyptian pyramids to oil rigs. Fortunately, many of them do include both indoor and outdoor locations, which makes for a vague amount of variation. The problem is everything looks too samey. It's like someone designed a small level, copied it and pasted it 50 times to make one big one, and then repeated the process.

To make matters worse, DFLW isn't exactly the most colourful of games either, and you soon find your eyes drifting on to more interesting things, like Ikea carpet swatches, just to give yourself something stimulating to look at. The graphics are sensationally dull, and the majority of enemies look more like inbred freaks than murderous terrorists. And while we're on the subject, most of them act with less intelligence than a brain damaged chimp. On one occasion I was lying on the ground with a terrorist stood directly in front of me. Guess what happened? Absolutely nothing. I could have started dancing in front of him and he probably wouldn't have reacted. On the flip side, when you are eventually spotted, they'll hunt you down, and on the harder difficulty settings, they're sickeningly accurate shots, even from a distance. If there's one thing that's going in DFLWs favour, it's that it's one of the most challenging games of its type. Just remember, you can only take a couple of hits before you die, and there are no power ups or med kits to pick up along the way to heal yourself with.

On the occasions where you work with other members of your squad, don't expect to have any control over them. As part of a team you're all given your orders from a central point, and you have to stick to your individual game plans.

Group Activities

There's one thing that always saves Novalogic games from plunging into the mirky depths of mediocrity, and that's multiplayer. DFLWis no exception. Using the fantastic Novaworld server, up to 50 players can compete against each other on any one of eight different multiplayer game types, including Deathmatch and King Of The Hill matches. The best thing about them is that you don't have to be subjected to the dubious computer Al, while the wide open landscapes provide a perfect setting for some excellent fire fights and the Voice Over Net Communication makes the whole experience that much more immersive.

Honesty Is A Virtue

Lets be honest, DFLW is no Counter-Strike. It's not even close. Neither does it measure up to Project IGI. However, the series does have a loyal following, and it's hard to believe that Novalogic won't have another hit on its hands, although if like me you've already played the game, it's hard to believe that they will. It's way too bugged, and the 3D engine leaves a lot to be desired. If you've got access to a network or you're lucky enough to own an ADSL line, then DFLWis more than worthy of your time. However, if you're looking for some great single-player action, then be prepared to be more than a little disappointed by a game, which could have been so much better, had someone bothered to invest more time and thought into it.

They're everywhere these days. Hidden behind crates in Counter-Strike, hogging the ramparts in Unreal Tournament, assembled in large numbers atop Team Fortress battlements. There they remain, rooted to the spot like Bernini sculptures, while the real men on their team head into battle and do combat the old fashioned way. While it could be said it's their job to plant one on you one before you see them, nobody likes a sniper. Nobody.

That is, unless the game in question is Delta Force, which Novalogic has been touting as a Shangri-La for cowardly bastards since its initial outing back in 1998. Here's a multiplayer shooter that actually wants you to lie on your lunch and play tin can alley with dots on the horizon. Of course, everyone around you has identical equipment, so when you're on the receiving end of one of these longdistance assassinations, you have no clue as to where your executioner lies, nor why your brain has decided to exit via your nostrils. Novalogic claims this is entertainment.

Strangely, they're not wrong. The sprawling outdoor vistas that form Land Warrior maps are often home to 50 or more players, the crack of distant sniper fire flicking your eardrums and making your eyes dart around the landscape in an adrenaline fuelled panic. The game is all about concealment and stealth, and the longer you stand upright, the shorter you're going to live, so sprint over to the armoury and run your hands over the tantalising range of shooters on offer. While the number of close quarters tools - MP5, AK-47, AUG and others - dwarf the range of sniper rifles, the gun you want if you're going to survive for more than a minute is one with a zoom lens. The Barrett is everyone's weapon of choice here, and with an effective range of more than 1.5km, you can put yourself a country mile away from the action and still come out on top.

Gameplay wise, movement is a little stilted compared to the fluidity of Unreal Tournament or Counter-Strike, and the graphics remain chunky close up, even though Novalogic has done away with its old VoxelSpace engine. Mind you, neither intrudes on your enjoyment. The sheer joy at finding an online shooter where you can play co-operatively, with you and your buddies ganging up in the single-player missions, is enough to obscure the game's numerous flaws.

So along with Capture The Flag, King Of The Hill and a few other familiar variations, co-op makes the multiplayer game a truly wonderful thing.

You're also ready to roll straight out of the box. The way you connect online is through NovaWorld, a hub of Novalogic's own servers that cover all the styles of play and permit up to 50 players to spread themselves about the map. NovaWorld is sewn seamlessly into the game interface, and does everything you need, it also permits Voice-Over-Net, which allows you to talk to your team mates in real time.

What we thought

"If you've got access to a network or are lucky enough to own an ADSL line, then DFIM is more than worthy of your time. However, if you're looking for some great single-player action, then be prepared to be more than a little disappointed..."

What you said

People say:

  • l read your magazine every month and trust your reviews a great deal. However, I decided to buy Delta Force Land Warrior despite its low score. I am the first to admit that the graphics leave a lot to be desired and the AI is a little suspect. However, the one merit that this game has is that it's incredibly fun to play. I worked through the campaigns with a real sense of enjoyment, which I hadn't felt since playing Deus Ex. The fact that many building models are used time and time again is a criticism that one could also level at Project IGIand, unlike IGI, Delta Force has some brilliant multiplayer options. On the whole I don't disagree with your review, I merely feel you were a bit harsh. Wouldn't 75 per cent have been a fairer score?
  • I bought DFLWa couple of weeks ago, mainly for its online options. The Delta Force series has never really stood out as a single-player game, and this one is no different. You're right, the landscapes are really dull, the AI is dreadful and everyone you kill seems to either float above the ground or sink into it But the multiplayer options are brilliant, and have provided me with many hours of trigger-happy enjoyment. As a single-player game I reckon it deserves about 50 per cent, but as an online one, it's probably pushing 90 per cent, so on balance, 69 per cent was about right.

Comment

Judging by the sales figures, DFUN is selling every bit as well as we thought It would. However, just because a game carries an established brand name and is therefore guaranteed to sell in droves doesn't mean we'll give it a really high score just for the sake of it Many of you only buy a few games a year, and in recognition of this, we try to be harsher than most other mags when it comes to scoring, so as to give you the best possible perspective. If we were less stringent it would be much harder for you to distinguish between a good game and a great game. I'd also like to point out that 69 per cent is by no means a low score.

Last month, we reviewed DFLW purely as a multiplayer game in the Online section and gave it a thoroughly deserved four out of five It's just a shame the single-player game turned out to be such a disappointment, as it could have been great, had it not been for some unforgivable bugs and a chronic lack of imagination. It would be Interesting to know what the rest of you thought of the single-player game. Why not send us your thoughts?

Bow your head for one short minute, as we pay tribute to what was once considered a ground-breaking movement in the world of 3D graphics. Today we see the passing away of the Voxel. Over the years it stood firm against the 3D accelerated revolution that swept the gaming world, causing everything other than the most powerful computers to chug away pathetically, as they tried to render its pointy and pixelated visuals. It leaves behind a legacy of no classic games, and subsequently will be missed by no one.

What Goes Around.

So they've finally gone and done it, a Delta Force game in full 3D. Viva La Revolution. Or perhaps I should say Viva La Mutterings Of Mild Political Discontent, because unfortunately, it seems to have arrived with more of a whimper than a war cry. This third instalment apparently utilises the same engine used by the US military to train its elite forces, and quite frankly if this is the case, then the American public should be genuinely worried. The landscapes aren't all that bad, in fact it's pretty rare that you get a game with 3D wide open areas in which you can freely roam around. Project IGI is the only other one that springs to mind.

DFLWs first major problem lies with its indoor locations, in which the frame rate feels totally wrong, even on the most powerful of machines. The animation has less fluidity than a cup of mucus, flickering to near epileptic-fit-inducing proportions in confined corridors. Then there's the clipping. What the hell is going on with that? Kill an enemy and half his body disappears into the floor, even if it's made of stone, and sometimes, if you shoot someone on a slope, they'll hover in mid air as though they've fallen on level ground. It took me two minutes to notice these faults. How a group of play testers and the developers failed to spot them, after spending several intimate months with the game, I'll never Know. And if this really is the engine that the world's most powerful nation uses to train its soldiers, then quite frankly, God help America.

Put Those Guns Away...

It's not all bad, of course, far from it. As a stealth/shooter, it manages to do the job admirably. There's huge scope for tactical variety, which of course allows you to play each mission in a way that suits your playing style (you can even play from a third-person viewpoint, but it's not much cop). You're given a choice between five special-forces soldiers, each with their own specialist skill, stupid student-like nickname (Gas Can, Longbow etc) and detailed description about their character and background. However, once you cut away the sob stories about their messed up childhoods and soul destroying previous professions, you find that what you've actually got is a choice between a demolitions expert, heavy gunner, martial artist, underwater demolitions expert, and a sniper. Unlike TFC, they can all carry any weaponry you care to equip them with, but obviously they'll be at their best when using their favoured weapon.

...See How Positive I'm Being?

DRfVhas one of the finest arrays of military equipment we've ever seen, and in terms of variety, betters even Counter-Strikers selection. Once again, your choice of hardware can be configured to cater for both your character's specialist skill, and your own playing style. If you're the kind of person who likes ripping off your shirt, dabbing on the war paint and screaming, "I am a machine'' while running around your room with a plastic gun, then one of the several rapid fire heavy machine guns should satisfy your would-be-Rambo pretensions.

However, if you've always fancied yourself as a bit of a Lewis Collins-alike, then you can stealthily creep round every level, taking your enemies down with a combination of silenced handguns and stealthy throat slitting knife action. For everyone else, there's a massive collection of assault rifles, with various add ons, such as grenade launchers and shotguns. There are even three different types of sniper rifle, perfect for all you one shot wonders, and the physics are spot on as well. Try running while firing and you'll spray bullets everywhere other than where you're aiming. Ifs a shame then that the same can't be said for your character, whose every jump resembles a graceful ballerina-like prance performed under low gravity conditions.

Each weapon varies in terms of penetration, with several powerful enough to fire through walls, as well as through some enemies with just a single bullet. We'd never even heard of half of this stuff, like the Heckler & Koch P11 Underwater Pistol, which uses an electric charge to fire bullets. Best of all though, there's a bazooka, and you can't say fairer than that.

Levelling With You

In terms of levels, I have to say that they're hardly the most inspiring selection I've ever come across ranging from the Egyptian pyramids to oil rigs. Fortunately, many of them do include both indoor and outdoor locations, which makes for a vague amount of variation. The problem is everything looks too samey. It's like someone designed a small level, copied it and pasted it 50 times to make one big one, and then repeated the process.

To make matters worse, DFLW isn't exactly the most colourful of games either, and you soon find your eyes drifting on to more interesting things, like Ikea carpet swatches, just to give yourself something stimulating to look at. The graphics are sensationally dull, and the majority of enemies look more like inbred freaks than murderous terrorists. And while we're on the subject, most of them act with less intelligence than a brain damaged chimp. On one occasion I was lying on the ground with a terrorist stood directly in front of me. Guess what happened? Absolutely nothing. I could have started dancing in front of him and he probably wouldn't have reacted. On the flip side, when you are eventually spotted, they'll hunt you down, and on the harder difficulty settings, they're sickeningly accurate shots, even from a distance. If there's one thing that's going in DFLWs favour, it's that it's one of the most challenging games of its type. Just remember, you can only take a couple of hits before you die, and there are no power ups or med kits to pick up along the way to heal yourself with.

On the occasions where you work with other members of your squad, don't expect to have any control over them. As part of a team you're all given your orders from a central point, and you have to stick to your individual game plans.

Group Activities

There's one thing that always saves Novalogic games from plunging into the mirky depths of mediocrity, and that's multiplayer. DFLWis no exception. Using the fantastic Novaworld server, up to 50 players can compete against each other on any one of eight different multiplayer game types, including Deathmatch and King Of The Hill matches. The best thing about them is that you don't have to be subjected to the dubious computer Al, while the wide open landscapes provide a perfect setting for some excellent fire fights and the Voice Over Net Communication makes the whole experience that much more immersive.

Honesty Is A Virtue

Lets be honest, DFLW is no Counter-Strike. It's not even close. Neither does it measure up to Project IGI. However, the series does have a loyal following, and it's hard to believe that Novalogic won't have another hit on its hands, although if like me you've already played the game, it's hard to believe that they will. It's way too bugged, and the 3D engine leaves a lot to be desired. If you've got access to a network or you're lucky enough to own an ADSL line, then DFLWis more than worthy of your time. However, if you're looking for some great single-player action, then be prepared to be more than a little disappointed by a game, which could have been so much better, had someone bothered to invest more time and thought into it.

They're everywhere these days. Hidden behind crates in Counter-Strike, hogging the ramparts in Unreal Tournament, assembled in large numbers atop Team Fortress battlements. There they remain, rooted to the spot like Bernini sculptures, while the real men on their team head into battle and do combat the old fashioned way. While it could be said it's their job to plant one on you one before you see them, nobody likes a sniper. Nobody.

That is, unless the game in question is Delta Force, which Novalogic has been touting as a Shangri-La for cowardly bastards since its initial outing back in 1998. Here's a multiplayer shooter that actually wants you to lie on your lunch and play tin can alley with dots on the horizon. Of course, everyone around you has identical equipment, so when you're on the receiving end of one of these longdistance assassinations, you have no clue as to where your executioner lies, nor why your brain has decided to exit via your nostrils. Novalogic claims this is entertainment.

Strangely, they're not wrong. The sprawling outdoor vistas that form Land Warrior maps are often home to 50 or more players, the crack of distant sniper fire flicking your eardrums and making your eyes dart around the landscape in an adrenaline fuelled panic. The game is all about concealment and stealth, and the longer you stand upright, the shorter you're going to live, so sprint over to the armoury and run your hands over the tantalising range of shooters on offer. While the number of close quarters tools - MP5, AK-47, AUG and others - dwarf the range of sniper rifles, the gun you want if you're going to survive for more than a minute is one with a zoom lens. The Barrett is everyone's weapon of choice here, and with an effective range of more than 1.5km, you can put yourself a country mile away from the action and still come out on top.

Gameplay wise, movement is a little stilted compared to the fluidity of Unreal Tournament or Counter-Strike, and the graphics remain chunky close up, even though Novalogic has done away with its old VoxelSpace engine. Mind you, neither intrudes on your enjoyment. The sheer joy at finding an online shooter where you can play co-operatively, with you and your buddies ganging up in the single-player missions, is enough to obscure the game's numerous flaws.

So along with Capture The Flag, King Of The Hill and a few other familiar variations, co-op makes the multiplayer game a truly wonderful thing.

You're also ready to roll straight out of the box. The way you connect online is through NovaWorld, a hub of Novalogic's own servers that cover all the styles of play and permit up to 50 players to spread themselves about the map. NovaWorld is sewn seamlessly into the game interface, and does everything you need, it also permits Voice-Over-Net, which allows you to talk to your team mates in real time.

What we thought

"If you've got access to a network or are lucky enough to own an ADSL line, then DFIM is more than worthy of your time. However, if you're looking for some great single-player action, then be prepared to be more than a little disappointed..."

What you said

People say:

  • l read your magazine every month and trust your reviews a great deal. However, I decided to buy Delta Force Land Warrior despite its low score. I am the first to admit that the graphics leave a lot to be desired and the AI is a little suspect. However, the one merit that this game has is that it's incredibly fun to play. I worked through the campaigns with a real sense of enjoyment, which I hadn't felt since playing Deus Ex. The fact that many building models are used time and time again is a criticism that one could also level at Project IGIand, unlike IGI, Delta Force has some brilliant multiplayer options. On the whole I don't disagree with your review, I merely feel you were a bit harsh. Wouldn't 75 per cent have been a fairer score?
  • I bought DFLWa couple of weeks ago, mainly for its online options. The Delta Force series has never really stood out as a single-player game, and this one is no different. You're right, the landscapes are really dull, the AI is dreadful and everyone you kill seems to either float above the ground or sink into it But the multiplayer options are brilliant, and have provided me with many hours of trigger-happy enjoyment. As a single-player game I reckon it deserves about 50 per cent, but as an online one, it's probably pushing 90 per cent, so on balance, 69 per cent was about right.

Comment

Judging by the sales figures, DFUN is selling every bit as well as we thought It would. However, just because a game carries an established brand name and is therefore guaranteed to sell in droves doesn't mean we'll give it a really high score just for the sake of it Many of you only buy a few games a year, and in recognition of this, we try to be harsher than most other mags when it comes to scoring, so as to give you the best possible perspective. If we were less stringent it would be much harder for you to distinguish between a good game and a great game. I'd also like to point out that 69 per cent is by no means a low score.

Last month, we reviewed DFLW purely as a multiplayer game in the Online section and gave it a thoroughly deserved four out of five It's just a shame the single-player game turned out to be such a disappointment, as it could have been great, had it not been for some unforgivable bugs and a chronic lack of imagination. It would be Interesting to know what the rest of you thought of the single-player game. Why not send us your thoughts?

Download Links

System Requirements

Processor: PC compatible, SystemP-100

OS: Win9xWindows 9x, Windows 2000 WinXPWindows XP, Vista, Win 7, Win 8, Win 10.

Game Features:Delta Force: Land Warrior supports single modeSingle game mode

Delta Force: Land Warrior Screenshots

Windows Screenshots

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Windows Screenshots

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